[ jump to a language at random ]

English

English is used in the UK, the US, and approximately a hundred other countries.

Dialects & accents shown below:  American/British, African American Vernacular English, Anglo-Manx, Appalachian, Australian, Baltimore, Bermuda, Black Country, Boston, Bristol, Brummie, Canadian, Chicago, Coal Speak, Cockney, Cockney Rhyming Slang, Cornwall, Cumbrian, Dorset, Dublin Slang, Dunglish, Durham, East Midlands, Engrish, Estuary, Furness, Geordie, Hartlepool Slang, Hiberno / Irish English, Jamaican, Kiwi Slang (New Zealand), Lakeland, Lancashire, Malaysian, Mawdesley, Mid Ulster, Newfoundland, New Hampshire, New York / New Jersey, Norfolk, Northern British, Nottingham, Philadelphia, Philippine, Pittsburgh, Potteries, Received Pronunciation, Runglish, Scottish, Scouse, Sheffield, Singlish, South African, Southwest Tyrone, Strine, Waterford Slang, Welsh, Wessex, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Yat, Yooper, Yorkshire, and Zulu
 
Dialects & accents elsewhere:  Austrian accent, Denglisch, German accent, "Hillbilly" accent, Redneck, Southern Drawl, Spanglish, Swedish accent, Texan accent, and Valspeak
 
Creole & pidgin entries elsewhere:  Bahamas Creole English, Belize Crole English, Bislama, Cameroon Pidgin / Kamtok, Gullah, Guyanese Creole English, Hawaiian Creole English, Jamaican Creole English, Krio, Lesser Antillean / Virgin Islands Creole English, Ndyuka, New Guinea Pidgin English / Tok Pisin, Nigerian Pidgin English, Pijin / Solomons Pidgin, and Sranan
 
Other English-related entries:  Historical forms of English (including Archaic, Middle, and Old English), modern English using different systems (Braille, Shavian, Shorthand, SMS, ...), language games (Pig Latin, Ubbi Dubbi, ...), English filtered through popular culture (mainly American TV and movies), and English transcribed/transliterated (into Arabic, Greek, Japanese, Russian, and many, many others)
 

top English

printed English:

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!

handwritten English:

[handwritten English]

shown using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

American pronunciation: British pronunciation:
[American English using IPA] [British English using IPA]

Language information at Wikipedia and Ethnologue



top African American Vernacular English

used in parts of the US

1) Where be my room?

2) Where be de beach?

3) Where be de bar?

4) Duzn't touch me dere!

Language information at Wikipedia

Alternate names for African American Vernacular English include Ebonics, Jive, Black English, Black Vernacular, and Black English Vernacular



top Anglo-Manx / Manx English

Anglo-Manx is used on the Isle of Man (part of the British Isles).

1) Wheer's my room?

2) Wheer's the baetch?

3) Wheer's the bar?

4) Dun' touch me theer!

Language information at Wikipedia

Anglo-Manx vocabulary

See Manx for Manx Gaelic


top Appalachian dialect

used in parts of the Appalachia region of the Appalachian Mountains within the US

1) Whur is mah room?

2) Whur is the beach?

3) Whur is the bar?

4) Don't touch me thur!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Australian pronunciation

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Australian pronunciation American pronunciation British pronunciation

Australia's Strine is shown separately

Language information at Wikipedia



top Baltimore dialect (also called Baltimorese, sometimes phonetically written as Bawlmerese or Ballimerese)

used in and around Baltimore, Maryland, US

1) Where is maw room?

2) Where is da ayshin?

3) Where is da bar?

4) Dehwn't touch me dere!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Bermuda dialect (also known as Bermudian English)

used in the Bermuda Islands

1) Ver is my room to?

2) Ver is de beach to?

3) Ver is de bar to?

4) Dun touch me der!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Black Country dialect

used in the Black Country area of England, UK

1) Whe'er is me room?

2) Whe'er is the strond?

3) Whe'er is the bor?

4) Doe touch me the'er!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Boston accent

used in the city of Boston and much of eastern Massachusetts, US

1) Wheyuh is my rum?

2) Wheyuh is the beach?

3) Wheyuh is the bah?

4) Don't touch me theyuh!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Bristol dialect (also known as Bristle or Brizzle)

used in the city of Bristol, England, UK

1) Where's me room to?

2) Where's the beach to?

3) Where's the bar to?

4) Don't touch I thur!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Brummie dialect

used in the Birmingham metropolitan area in England, UK

1) Where is me room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the broo'us?

4) Don't touch me the'er!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Canadian pronunciation

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Canadian pronunciation American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top Chicago accent (also known as Chicago-ese / Chicagoese)

used in and around Chicago, Illinois, US

1) Where's my room?

2) Where's da beach?

3) Where's da bar?

4) Don't touch me dere!

See How to Speak Chicago-ese



top Coal Speak

used in the Coal Region of northeastern Pennsylvania, US

1) Where's me room?

2) Where's da shore?

3) Where's da beer garden?

4) Ya daresn't touch me dere!

The Official CoalRegion Dictionary



top Cockney Accent

used by Cockneys in parts of the London area

1) Where is me room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don' touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Cockney accent American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top Cockney Rhyming Slang

originated in the East End of London; used in parts of the the UK & the Republic of Ireland

1) Where is me va va voom?

2) Where is the bloomin' beach?

3) Where is the chuffin' Near and Far?

4) Daan't touch me there!

Language information at Wikipedia and the Cockney Rhyming Slang website



top Cornwall dialect

used in parts of England's Cornwall county, UK

1) Wheere es my rum?

2) Wheere es th' beach?

3) Wheere es th' bar?

4) Don't touch me theere!

Language information at Wikipedia

See also Cornish



top Cumbrian dialect

used in parts of England's Cumbria county, UK

1) Wheeyer is me room, eh?

2) Wheeyer is the beach, eh?

3) Wheeyer is the bar, eh?

4) Don't touch me there, like eh!

Cumbrian glossary



top Dorset dialect

used in parts of England's Dorset county, UK

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Dublin Slang

used in and around Dublin, the capital of Ireland

1) Where is me room?

2) Where is the strand?

3) Where is the boozer?

4) Lay off!

Dublin dictionary at the O'Byrne Files



top Dunglish

a combination of Dutch and English used in parts of the Netherlands and Belgium

1) Wèr is mai roem?

2) Wèr is de bietsj?

3) Wèr is de bar?

4) Doont tatsj mie der!


Language information at Wikipedia in English and Dutch

Humorous examples can be found on the site Dunglish: Where Dutch and English collide

Alternate names for Dunglish include Dutch English, Steenkolenengels, Amerilands, Dutchglish Dutchlish, Engerlands, Englutch, Inglisj, Nederengels, and Stone Coal English.



top Durham dialect

used in and around the city of Durham, England, UK

1) Where's me rewm?

2) Where's t' beach?

3) Where's t' bar?

4) Divvent touch mah there!


Language information at Wikipedia



top East Midlands dialect

used in the East Midlands region of England, UK

1) Wheer's me room?

2) Wheer's th' baech?

3) Wheer's th' bar?

4) Dunna touch me there!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Engrish

fractured English often seen in Asian advertising, signs, and other printed material

1) As for my room it is somewhere?

2) As for the beach it is somewhere?

3) As for the bar it is somewhere?

4) In me concerning there it is not good!

Language information at Wikipedia and engrish.com

Benjamin Zimmer posted a great explanation and illustration of Engrish

Hanzi Smatter shows the flip side: misused Chinse characters in Western culture



top Estuary English

used in the South East England and East of England regions, especially along the River Thames and its estuary

1) Where's my room?

2) Where's the beach?

3) Where's the bar?

4) Don' touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Estuary English pronunciation American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top Furness dialect

used in and around the town of Barrow-in-Furness in the south of England's Cumbria county, UK

1) Whar's me roum?

2) Whar's t'shoor?

3) Whar's t'bar?

4) Dewn't touch ma ter!


Furness dialect dictionary



top Geordie dialect

used in and around England's Tyneside area, UK

1) Weor is me room?

2) Weor is the sands?

3) Weor is the bor?

4) Divvent toich wor thor!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Hartlepool Slang

used in the town of Hartlepool, England, UK.

1) Wers me room at?

2) Wers the beach at?

3) Wers the pub at?

4) Doan touch me ther!

Additional information at hartlepoolslang and the Indigo Group



top Hiberno dialect / Irish English

used in parts of Ireland

1) Wha is me room?

2) Wha is de stran'?

3) Wha is de boozer?

4) Don't touch me dare!

Language information at Wikipedia

See Irish Gaelic for Gaelic



top Jamaican dialect

used in parts of Jamaica

1) Where is I room?

2) Where is de beach?

3) Where is de bar?

4) Don't touch I deh!

Language information at the Wikipedia

The Jamaican dialect is also called Jamaican Standard English and should not be confused with Jamaican Creole English



top Kiwi Slang

used in New Zealand

North Island:

1) Where is my bach?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the pub?

4) Naff off!
            

South Island:

1) Where is my crib?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the pub?

4) Naff off!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Lakeland dialect

used in the former county of Westmorland in northwestern England, UK

1) Weers mi room?

2) Weers t' beach?

3) Weers t' bar?

4) Divvent touch me theer!




top Lancashire dialect

used in Lancashire county, England, UK

1) Wheer is mi rayum?

2) Wheer is th'beych?

3) Wheer is th'barr?

4) Don't touch us theer!

Language information at Lanky Talk



top Malaysian English (also known as Malaysian Standard English)

used in Malaysia

1) Where is my room ar?

2) Where is the beach ar?

3) Where is the bar ar?

4) Don't touch me there, lah!

Note that Malaysian English is different than Malaysian Colloquial English (Manglish)

Language information at Wikipedia



top Mawdesley dialect

used in Mawdesley Village in Lancashire county, England, UK

1) Wheer is me rayum?

2) Wheer is t' beeuch?

3) Wheer is t' bar?

4) Dohnd tutch me theer!




top Mid Ulster English

used in the Province of Ulster, Ireland

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Mid Ulster English American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top Newfoundland pronunciation

used on Newfoundland Island, Canada

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Newfoundland pronunciation American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top New Hampshire accent

used in New Hampshire, US

1) Wheyah is my room?

2) Wheyah is the beach?

3) Wheyah is the bah?

4) Don't touch me theyah!

Language information at Wikipedia



top New York / New Jersey dialect

used in the New York City metropolitan area including Northern New Jersey, US

1) Where is my room, or what?

2) Where is de beach, or what

3) Where is de bar, or what

4) Don't touch me dere! Okay?

Language information at Wikipedia

Alternate names for the New York dialect include New Yorkese, the New Jersey dialect, the Brooklyn accent, and Brooklynese



top Norfolk dialect/accent (also known as Broad Norfolk)

used in Norfolk County, England, UK

1) Where is moi rume?

2) Where is thur beach?

3) Where is thur bar?

4) Doon't touch me there!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Northern British English

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Canadian pronunciation American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top Nottinghamese

used in Nottinghamshire, England, UK

Nottingham English:

1) Wair is maij roomm?

2) Wair is ðe beech?

3) Wair is ðe booze?

4) Doewn't tuch mi ðair!
            

Notts Lingo:

1) Wairz meh room?

2) Wairza beach?

3) Wairza booza?

4) Gerroff meh!




top Philadelphia accent

spoken in and around Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

1) Where is muhy room?

2) Where is duh shewr?

3) Where is duh bear?

4) Doawn't tetch me dere!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Philippine English

used in the Philippines by the media and a majority of Filipinos

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Philippine English American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top Pittsburgh accent (also known as Pittsburghese or Yinzbonics)

used in the area of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US

1) Werz ahbahts 'z my room?

2) Werz ahbahts 'z duh beach?

3) Werz ahbahts 'z duh beer garten?

4) Don't touch me dere!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Potteries dialect (also known as the North Staffordshire dialect)

used in and around the city of Stoke-on-Trent in the Midlands, UK

1) Weer is moi rooem?

2) Weer is the beech?

3) Weer is the bor?

4) Dunna touch me theer!

Language information at the Stoke-on-Trent site and Wikipedia



top Received Pronunciation sociolect

a form of English with modified pronunciation, usually defined as the "educated spoken English of southeastern England", UK
also called the Queen's English, the King's English, Oxford English, and BBC English

1) I'm terribly sorry but where is one's room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the public house?

4) Don't touch myself there!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Runglish (also known as Ruglish or Russlish)

used by native Russian speakers, especially in Russian communities in English speaking countries

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is beach?

3) Where is bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Runglish using IPA American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia and runglish1.narod.ru



top Scottish pronunciation

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Scottish pronunciation American pronunciation British pronunciation

Language information at Wikipedia



top Scouse dialect (also known as the Liverpool dialect)

used in the English city of Liverpool and adjoining urban areas of Merseyside, UK

1) Whuz is me rewm?

2) Whuz is de beach?

3) Whuz is de bewzer?

4) Don't teruch me thuz!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Sheffield dialect

used in and around the area of Sheffield, England, UK

1) Whear is mo room?

2) Whear is t' beeach?

3) Whear is t' bar?

4) Dooant touch ma thear!



top Singlish

used in Singapore

1) My room, where ah?

2) The beach, where ah?

3) The bar, where ah?

4) Dun touch me there ah!

Language information at Wikipedia



top South African dialect

used in parts of South Africa and some neighboring countries

1) Where's my room boet?

2) Where's the beach?

3) Where can I have a dop?

4) Jislaaik, don't touch me there!

Language information at Wikipedia

Surfrikan Slang dictionary



top Southwest Tyrone English

used in parts of County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, UK

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Southwest Tyrone English American pronunciation British pronunciation



top Strine

used in parts of Australia

1) Wezzme room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the pub?

4) Buzz off!

The Australian pronunciation of standard English is shown separately

Language information at Wikipedia



top Waterford Slang

used in the City of Waterford, Ireland

1) Where is me room?

2) Where is de beach?

3) Where is de bar?

4) Don't touch me dayer!




top Welsh English (also known as Anglo-Welsh or Wenglish)

used in Wales, UK

1) Where to's my room?

2) Where to's the beach?

3) Where to's the bar?

4) Dawn't touch me there!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Wessex dialect (also known as the Somerset dialect or the West Country dialect)

used in parts of the South West region of England, UK

1) Whirr be my room to?

2) Whirr be the beach to?

3) Whirr be the bar to?

4) Don't touch me there!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Westmorland dialect

used in parts of England's Westmorland area, UK

1) Wheear's my room?

2) Wheear's t' beach?

3) Wheear's t' bar?

4) Dunnot touch me theear!



top Wiltshire dialect

used in parts of England's Wiltshire ceremonial county, UK

1) Wher uz my room?

2) Wher uz th' beach?

3) Wher uz th' bar?

4) Dwont touch m' thur!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Yat accent

used in and around New Orleans, Louisiana, US

1) Where my room at?

2) Where da beach at?

3) Where da bar at?

4) Don't touch me dere!

Language information at Wikipedia



top Yooper dialect

used in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and parts of Wisconsin, US

1) Vere is my Room, eh?

2) Vere is da Strand, eh?

3) Vere is da Taffern, eh?

4) Don't touch me dere, eh!

Language information at Wikipedia

Yooper Humor site



top Yorkshire dialect (also known as Tyke)

used in parts of England's traditional Yorkshire county, UK

1) Wheear is uz roa?

2) Wheear is t' beach?

3) Wheear is t' bar?

4) Dooant touch uz theear!

Language information at Wikipedia, the Yorkshire dialect page and the Yorkshire Folk Talk page



top Zulu English / Black African English

a form of South African English used predominately by blacks in South Africa

1) Where is my room?

2) Where is the beach?

3) Where is the bar?

4) Don't touch me there!


shown using IPA: American comparison: British comparison:
Zulu English American pronunciation British pronunciation



Writing system information at Omniglot

Dan Short's timeline of the history of the English language shows how English has evolved


The four essential
travel phrases in English:

1) Where is my room?
2) Where is the beach?
3) Where is the bar?
4) Don't touch me there!
Do you have a language or dialect to add?
Did I get something wrong?
Please let me know...

contact information